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Thursday, May 30, 2013

Police Fall Workshops Announced: Randy Means is Back!

Randy Means presents at the 2012 LMCIT police workshops.
The 2013 League of Minnesota Cities Insurance Trust (LMCIT) fall police workshops will again feature Randy Means. Mr. Means presented last fall, and we are delighted to have him committed for additional workshops this October. Our staff continues to receive compliments about this training even now.

Mr. Means will be presenting “Police Leadership in the New Normal – Part 1”, on Monday, October 7 at the Big Woods Conference Center in Fergus Falls. This will be the same course Mr. Means presented last fall in White Bear Lake and Bloomington. It will be a one-day class with a focus on leadership, supervision, discipline, and risk management. 

“Police Leadership in the New Normal - Part II” will be presented on October 8 and 9 at the White Bear Lake PD and on October 10 and 11 at Shakopee PD. These two-day courses will include hands-on problem solving and will build on the themes from his workshops last fall. This is a stand-alone course, and the first course is not a prerequisite.

Lunch will be included for all of the workshops, and the training will be submitted for POST continuing education credits.

Watch www.lmc.org for registration information.

Remember:

Responder Safety = Public Safety

Up next...Some helpful links.

In the meantime, stay safe and be careful.

Rob

Monday, May 20, 2013

Ethical Use of Databases - Free Web-Based Training

The LMCIT PATROL (Police Accredited Training Online) course on the “Ethical Use of Databases” will be made available to all Minnesota law enforcement officers at no charge. The course was initially released in the spring of 2012 to officers and departments enrolled in the PATROL online training program.

The course is approved for one POST credit and will provide officers with the information necessary for properly using computers and law enforcement databases in full compliance with state and federal laws, as well as with department polices. It will follow the traditional PATROL online learning format, which uses periodic “check for understanding” quizzes—and officers will be required to pass a test upon completion of the module in order to obtain the certificate of completion.

The course will be available beginning June 1, 2013. For questions, contact Laura Honeck at lhoneck@lmc.org or (651) 281-1280.

Remember:

                                                  Responder Safety = Public Safety

Up next...The dates and locations for the fall police workshops—Randy Means is back!

In the meantime, stay safe and be careful.

Rob

Thursday, May 2, 2013

Roadway Responder Safety: “Communication, Coordination, Cooperation”

Apple Valley responders work at a crash scene.
Minnesota’s first responders have made progress in the area of increased safety while working at crash scenes on the roadways. Vehicle crashes scenes are complicated, as they bring together a variety of responders—it is often a combination of local police, county deputies, state troopers, local fire departments, local EMS, ambulances, medical transport units or even a medical transport helicopter that respond to the scene. MnDOT, county highway departments, and private towing companies are also part of this “dance” of equipment and people. The scenes are dynamic in that units arrive one at a time, crews deploy to complete their tasks, some units leave before others, and all of this is occurring on roadways and highways that are often open to traffic.

Recently Judy Thill, chief of the Inver Grove Fire Department, said “great steps” have been made to improve crash scene safety and noted that it’s “communication, coordination, and cooperation” that makes these scenes safe. Chief Thill and MnDOT Freeway Supervisor John McClellan have trained hundreds of first responders in how to do this in the Roadway Responder Safety training. Whether watching the news or driving our highways, it is evident that the training has taken hold and is being implemented. It is becoming rare to see emergency scenes that are not protected by the proper positioning of squad cars or fire rescue apparatus, or to see a responder not wearing a high visibility garment.

During a recent snowstorm, I came upon a crash on I-94. The road information sign on I-94 advised the line of slow-moving cars that there was a crash ahead. I spotted a State Patrol car protecting the scene, and I could not miss the trooper wearing his high-visibility jacket.
The Avon Fire Department arrives at the scene of a crash.


Weeks later, I was stopped during the evening rush hour traffic on MN-13 due to a multi-car crash that had wrecked cars and injured drivers in both the eastbound and westbound lanes.  What a mess. The responding Savage police officers used their cars to protect the scenes, and their high-visibility vests were put on in one motion as the officers stepped out of their cars and began caring for the injured.

I also spotted media photos of the Apple Valley Fire Department working at the scene of a crash. In this scene, the roadway was closed and every responder had their vest on!

And during a recent meeting with fire chiefs and trainers in Stearns County, I complimented the Avon Fire Department on the high-visibility chevron striping on the back of their trucks. They told me their last truck had just received the stripes and showed me photos of a recent crash scene on the freeway.  Again, vests were on, and the scene was protected by their trucks.

If you would like to know more about the Roadway Responder Safety training, you can contact either:

Chief Judy Thill at (651) 450-2495 or jthill@invergroveheights.org
John McClellan (651) 234-7025 or john.mcclellan@state.mn.us

Remember:

                                                  Responder Safety = Public Safety

Up next…”PATROL Course on the Ethical Use of Data Bases Will Be Available Statewide—And At No Charge”

In the meantime, stay safe and be careful.

Rob